Movement matters

 

Integrated Learning Therapy (ILT) practitioners have tried hard over the years to encourage schools to introduce more movement into classrooms.  We understand the terrible pressure put on teachers and learners by curriculum demands, so have worked with pre-school teachers, believing that they have more classroom time to devote to all-important movement.   Imagine our disappointment when we heard from one school that had followed our movement programme with their Grade R learners for some years – with noted success – that they were obliged to stop the programme. The reason was that they now have to use that time to teach the preschoolers how to read.

 

This is doubly sad because not only are those children missing out on the chance to ‘catch up’ on any possible areas of delayed brain development, they are also missing out on vital time spent moving.  There is much written these days about the value of movement and the positive impact that physical activity has on academic learning. With this knowledge, there should be no doubt that introducing movement into classrooms is worthwhile.

 

To our knowledge, many teachers are trying hard to do this, so I thought some information about the latest research might help justify their efforts.  Also, some information about different types of movement might be helpful to get maximum benefit in the shortest possible time.  Before discussing the research into different physical movement strategies, this article will briefly discuss ‘mindful movement’ versus ‘non-mindful movement’.

 

Mindful movement (also called ‘purposeful movement’) is referred to when physical activities are integrated directly with learning goals.  For example, when children form the letters of the alphabet with their bodies, or illustrate the orbits of the planets by walking around a central sun.  The quality of the movement is less important than the fact that learners are focusing on academic content.  Movement is used here as a tool for reaching teaching goals.

 

Non-mindful movement is physical activity that is unrelated to academics.  Examples would be running on the spot, running around the playground before a lesson, sitting on a wobbly cushion, pushing legs against a length of elastic tied around the chair legs, and so on.

 

In other words, mindful movement uses movement activities to teach and learn directly; non-mindful movement does not.

 

Generally, research shows that both types of movement can benefit learning.  Teachers (and school administrators) may fear that movement takes time away from teaching and so will interfere with academic performance.  The evidence gathered in recent years indicates that these fears are groundless.  Learners benefit in more ways than one and a responsive brain results in more efficient learning.

 

To help teachers understand more about the value of movement for learning, the next few posts will share some of these research studies.

 

Integrated Learning Therapy (ILT) tries to help children reach their potential by addressing all the possible barriers to learning.  Visit our website www.ilt.co.za to learn more about our approach, find a practitioner near you to help and also see what courses we offer for teachers to better understand brain development, function and learning. Our courses are accredited with SACE (for CPTD points) and ETDP-SETA (for credits towards further qualifications in Special Needs Education).

 

You can write to us directly at info@ilt.co.za.

 

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