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What is ILT?

If you are reading this, the chances are that you have a child who is struggling at school. Maybe he or she is finding it difficult to master skills such as reading, writing, maths or spelling. Maybe he or she can do all these things but comes home with reports about unfinished work, or work left at home.

The teacher complains about her being disorganised, untidy or even aggressive towards other children. Or maybe she is described as being unfocused and a daydreamer who never seems to listen. And maybe you agree with the teacher because you see the same behaviour at home.

Labels such as ADHD, Dyslexia, Auditory Processing Problems, Sensory Processing Disorder are mentioned. What’s going on?


Testimonials

  • GDE Pychologist

    These courses are the best I have every attended – out of many, many, many!

  • Marandi Thomas B.Ed. Hons

    Former Grade R teacher: Milnerton Pre-Primary School

    I am so glad that we were introduced to ILT! Lisa is an ILT practitioner at our school and all the learners that went to her improved drastically in all areas of development. The learners whose parents were hesitant to follow an ILT program and preferred sending their children to either Physio or Occupational Therapy (because they knew more about it) did not even show half as much improvement.  It is AMAZING! One of my boys was clumsy, had a speech problem, could not concentrate for more than a second, etc…and after only two months of following his ILT program with Lisa his speech improved DRASTICALLY, he is able to concentrate, he can do fine motor activities, he is not clumsy anymore…if I did not know that he was following the ILT program, I would have thought it was a miracle. 🙂

  • Do learning difficulties affect children’s emotions?

    Parents and teachers alike will agree that children who struggle at school usually feel bad about their academic abilities.  Most of them will certainly have some emotional problem related to the learning difficulty.

    While this is probably considered to be a ‘known fact’ amongst educators, another fact, gleaned from practical experience, is that the priority seems to be on the diagnosis and remediation of the learning difficulty or disability. The need to address the emotional aspects takes a backseat.

     The way emotions and learning difficulties or disabilities interact is a complex subject and not always easy to unravel. Essentially, there are some guidelines to keep in mind:

    •  Emotional distress may be caused by learning difficulties.Learners who fail to thrive at school may suffer from anxiety, depression, loneliness and low self-esteem – especially regarding their academic abilities
    • Learning difficulties may aggravate social and emotional functioning.If a child struggles with mental processing that is severe enough to cause a learning problem, they may experience problems in nonacademic areas as well. This typically shows itself in behaviours that don’t conform to the child’s social environment. The result is escalating emotional concerns such as feelings of being misunderstood, sadness and anxiety – all on which may already be present because of the learning problem.
    • Emotional issues can disguise a child’s learning disability. This may happen if the child resorts to defiant behaviours such as ‘acting-out,’ distracting behaviours such as being the ‘class clown’ or complaints about physical ailments.Adults’ focus might be on the undesired actions and the learning difficulty could be overlooked.
    • Emotional issues may aggravate learning difficulties.Constant failure to succeed at school may lead to stress or feelings of inferiority which can intensify the learning problem.  A child who, for example, consistently struggles with certain academic tasks may decrease the child’s ability to pay attention and concentrate on the work.
    • On the other hand, a child with learning difficulties who enjoys good emotional health may find it easier to cope with challenges. This can enhance school performance.

     This last finding emphasises the importance of ensuring that children with a learning difficulty or disability are well supported emotionally and socially.  On the positive side, parents and teachers usually do try to understand the complexities of the interaction between emotional functioning and learning difficulties. Most do try to ensure that the help the child receives is not limited to academic remediation.

     Content for this post was based on an article entitled ‘Understanding children’s hearts and minds: Emotional functioning and learning disabilities’ written by Jean Cheng Gormon and available at: www.idonline.org/article/626292/?theme=print.

     

  • Baby-led weaning or spoon feeding? The difference it makes to your child’s eating habits is actually very small

    This article appeared in a Science newsletter on April 2nd2019.  We thought it might be of interest as so many children these days present as ‘picky’ eaters who are difficult to feed.

    It was written by Sophia Komninou, The Conversation

    When it comes to avoiding picky eating and meal time tantrums, parents are usually ready to try any method that promises their child will become a better and less fussy eater. This is in part why methods of giving solid food to infants have received a lot of attention in the last few years. Some think that the way babies are introduced to solids can change their attitudes to food into childhood or even for life.

    The most common method used to give babies their first solids has long been to offer a puree or mash using a spoon. This helps parents make sure their babies receive adequate energy and nutrients for their development – something many are often anxious over.

    More recently, however, baby-led weaning has gained popularity – and divided parents. This method sees babies selecting finger foods – such as carrot sticks, broccoli trees or other pieces of whole, baby-fist size pieces of food – and feedingthemselves. While there have been unsubstantiated claims that this method can improve a baby’s dexterity and confidence, research has associated baby-led weaning with their ability to recognise when they are full and being less fussy with their food. This makes it an appealing choice for some parents.

    However, as with most things baby-related, the reality is that many parents don’t use just one method of feeding. It changes depending on the time, day or situation they are in. Which is why, for our recently published study, we wanted to compare how different styles of feeding affects a baby’s eating habits and attitudes to food.

    Is baby-led weaning better?

    We looked at four different categories of toddlers, whose parents introduced them to solids using either: solely baby-led weaning, mostly baby-led weaning with occasional spoon feeding, mostly spoon feeding with occasional finger foods, or just spoon feeding. We asked the parents questions about their feeding strategies and eating behaviours of their toddlers, like fussiness and food enjoyment. 

    Usually, in a statistical analysis, we look at whether there is a difference between groups. But what this doesn’t tell us is how big the difference actually is. To solve this problem, we looked at the size of the difference between the groups (what we call the effect size). It helps us understand whether the difference actually matters. 

    We found that the magnitude of difference in a toddler’s fussiness and food enjoyment is minimal across the four groups. This means that baby-led weaning, spoon-feeding or anything in between might not actually be the solution to future mealtime battlegrounds some parents hope it will be. That may seem to be in contrast with what the research shows so far, but it doesn’t negate those findings. Babies will be less picky about their food if they are fed using baby-led weaning as opposed to any of the other types of feeding, it’s just not by that much.

    Socio-economics at play

    When looking at the strategies parents use to feed their children, our study did show that those who follow baby-led weaning are less likely to use food as a reward or encouragement, and have less control on eating overall. This helps their toddlers learn to make eating decisions for themselves based on whether they are hungry or full. These parents are also more likely to breastfeed for longer, introduce solids after six months and eat more frequently with their toddlers.

    However, the key difference here is not that the children were fed using baby-led weaning but instead the type of families who usually follow it. Our findings show that these parents are usually of a higher socio-economic status and more educated, which makes them more likely to follow a distinctly different parenting style and be able to afford to spend more time and money doing so.

    Overall, our results suggest that the way a baby is introduced to solids will make very little difference to how fussy they will become, or how much they will enjoy food. It is important to remember that how children eat depend on a lot of factors, including their genetic background, their past experiences with food and their interaction with their parents.

    Research findings are important when communicating complementary feeding advice to new parents, but headlines and quoted study results can often be misleading. So remember that when reports of research say there is a difference between one method over another, it’s not the whole story. The size of this difference – something that is not often communicated – matters too. The most important thing that parents can do is to try their best and introduce solids in a way that is more appropriate for their family, rather than stressing about a specific method, as research suggests might make a only a very small difference.

     

     

  • The role of the inner ear in Dyslexia and ADHD

    Understanding how the vestibular works and, more importantly, how it affects our functioning makes it easier to understand why it is implicated in syndromes like dyslexia and ADHD.  It also helps to explain why and how certain, specific movements improve vestibular functioning and make positive differences to children struggling at school. 

    The role of the inner-ear or vestibular system underlying cognitive and behavioral disorders and their treatment has been studied by many gifted clinicians and therapists. However, the role of both the inner-ear and cerebellum (the ‘small brain’ at the base of the larger cerebrum) in determining ADHD dates back to the pioneering dyslexia research of Frank and Levinson initially published in 1973, and then evolving over four decades. By recognizing that dyslexia and ADHD are significantly overlapping disorders characterized by imbalance and poor coordination, Levinson proposed that both disorders stem from one common impairment– a signal-scrambling dysfunction of inner-ear/cerebellar origin. His ADHD data and concepts were published in numerous papers and books.  Significantly, these concepts are consistent with the cerebellar research of Noble Laureate Sir John Eccles and outstanding others as well as inner-ear clinicians called neurotologists, hence gaining their support.

    Levinson explained the ‘signal-scrambling’ as follows: “Just imagine the symptoms induced by spinning until dizzy. When dizzy you can’t properly read, write, speak, recall, think, plan, concentrate, orient, balance and coordinate. It’s as if the signals transmitted to varied brain structures are ‘dizzy’ or scrambled and so cannot be normally processed. They thus induce temporary dyslexic or ADHD-like states. It’s the dizzy or scrambled signals that are considered etiologically most important, not necessarily the conscious sensation or experience of dizziness which may lessen, disappear or be absent. “This analogy also explains how and why signal stabilizing medications, including inner-ear enhancing antihistamines and stimulants, are so effective in treating both dyslexia and ADHD. And it further explains the efficacy of anti-vertigo therapies in preventing the inner-ear triggered reading reversals (“space dyslexia”) and impaired concentration, orientation and balance (“space ADHD”) in orbiting astronauts.

    There isn’t enough recent research to support Levinson’s findings but a 2013 study by Jean Hebert and colleagues published in Science provided important experimental evidence that a genetically induced inner-ear impairment in mice was linked to hyperactivity and thus might cause ADHD in humans.(http://www.einstein.yu.edu/news/releases/932/inner-ear-disorders-may-cause-hyperactivity/

     

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